In the past several years, as the Internet has become a huge part of communications and a huge part of the way many people deliver information back and forth, the changes wrought by the Internet have made an enormous impact on the publishing industry. Years ago, most detailed information was delivered via the printed word, with newspapers and magazines being regularly used as a means of getting information out. Whether or not the information was entertainment oriented or educational, the use of the printed word to deliver information was very reliable. Today, things have changed, but in many ways they are still evolving.

The Ongoing Popularity of Print

Printed magazines have long been a popular medium. For many people, sitting down with a glossy magazine, whether the topic is art, fashion, news, or even
thin film metrology, can be a great way to relax and also take in a great deal of information. There’s something about the process of turning pages and reviewing words slowly that makes this a great way to take in a lot of information and also to retain it. All of this is why printed material is still widely used to convey information, even though digital forms have taken over a lot of the modern media.

Print vs. Digital

Today, the shakeout over print vs. digital formats is still ongoing. To deal with this, many publications now have both printed and online versions available for customers to review. What many people now say is that while they get a lot of quick information over the Internet (like short articles), they still like to hold a book or magazine if they are reading for enjoyment. This is valuable information for the publishing world, as the medium of print isn’t totally dying out as was predicted a few years ago. Book publishing has changed, but it is still a viable product that sells well.

So, in the end, there’s no question that reading is an activity that is here to stay, and reading a printed piece is also an activity that is not going to go the way of the dinosaurs anytime soon (as was predicted). This is information that will likely bring a sigh of relief to many publishers who still love the idea of producing a tangible product that can be held, read, and enjoyed.